Lindley RR Depot 1904



When I posted the photos of the Railroad depots in Lindley/Presho, I asked if anyone had information on the depot that was located by the Lindley bridge .


Thanks to Larry Gorges, I think the mystery has been solved. THANKS LARRY


Larry forwarded a copy of an article from The Corning Journal - Wednesday January 18,1904 pg 5. Below is a copy of the attachment that he sent.


" New Station At Lindley "
The New York Central Railroad Company has built a new passenger station at Lindley, about a half mile north of the old station which latter has been abandoned .The giving up of the old station was opposed by some of the most influential ciitizens of the village on the ground that the change of the site would not be so convenient to the people. The matter was taken before the State Railroad Commission ,which decided in favor of the Company ".
The new station was located in back of the "Station" or River Road School at the west end of the Church Creek Road. The depot is now the living room of the Kernan home -having been moved there by Warren and Eleanor Stuart when they built their new home on Church Creek Road. The old school is now a residence (*Kitty)


Also ,in looking for information on blacksmiths, I found the following statement by William Burr in his 1951 History of Lindley.


"All of us who lived 75 years ago remember Hiram Middlebrook's store which once stood where the east road crosses the bridge and the railroad and where the old passenger station once stood. We remember it well because there is where we used to trade eggs for candy. He used to live in the white house on the hill a few rods to the south in a large pine grove in which his mortal remains now rest. All his descendants have gone from Lindley."


I had read this description several times ,but had overlooked the fact that he was describing the "old" depot.


The stones for Mr. Middlebrook and several of his family members are still
in the Pine Grove,but in poor condition)(* Kitty)













































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