Bill of Rights Day


Today December 15th is celebrated as Bill of Rights Day

Below is some of the information found in the Wikipedia Encyclopedia .
A google search will give other sites with additional information.
Sometimes it is good to review some of the fundementals associated with our Democracy and the freedoms we enjoy -- thanks to our forefathers efforts.
Kitty



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United States Bill of Rights





United States Bill of Rights

Created September 25, 1789

Ratified December 15, 1791

Location National Archives

Author(s) James Madison

Purpose To set limits on what the government can and cannot do in regard to personal liberties.



The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. These limitations serve to protect the natural rights of liberty and property. They guarantee a number of personal freedoms, limit the government's power in judicial and other proceedings, and reserve some powers to the states and the public. While originally the amendments applied only to the federal government, most of their provisions have since been held to apply to the states by way of the Fourteenth Amendment.


The amendments were introduced by James Madison to the 1st United States Congress as a series of legislative articles. They were adopted by the House of Representatives on August 21, 1789,[1][2] formally proposed by joint resolution of Congress on September 25, 1789, and came into effect as Constitutional Amendments on December 15, 1791, through the process of ratification by three-fourths of the States. While twelve amendments were passed by Congress, only ten were originally passed by the states. Of the remaining two, one was adopted as the Twenty-seventh Amendment and the other technically remains pending before the states.



Originally, the Bill of Rights included legal protection for land-owning white men only,[3] excluding African Americans[4] and women.[5][6] It took additional Constitutional Amendments and numerous Supreme Court cases to extend the same rights to all U.S. citizens.



The Bill of Rights plays a key role in American law and government, and remains a vital symbol of the freedoms and culture of the nation. One of the first fourteen copies of the Bill of Rights is on public display at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

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